October 13 2015
By Kristoffe Biglete

Balder Onarheim

Balder is PhD and creativity researcher devoted to understand and disseminate knowledge about the neurological underpinnings of creativity.

In everyday language, ‘creativity’ is often used in relation to artistic creation. But amongst scholarly researchers it is acknowledged that creativity is one of the most crucial human traits.

Creativity is not just about art – it is one of the most crucial human traits.
It lies at the heart of innovation, thus it is not a superficial skill but a necessity for human survival.

Balder is PhD and creativity researcher at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and the founder of the Copenhagen Institute of NeuroCreativity – an institute devoted to understand and disseminate knowledge about the neurological underpinnings of creativity.
But are modern humans creative at all? Several studies point to the fact that as we grow up, we loose our ability for creative thinking: non-creative behavior is learned, as famously stated by George Land. Land and fellow academic researchers have studied ways to relearn creativity, and in his talk dr. Onarheim will summarise his research in the area – focusing on concrete approaches to relearning creativity.

Growing up makes us less creative. Therefore we have to re-learn creativity, and luckily there are multiple ways to do so.

Balder has lectured about creativity at numerous international universities, including Stanford University and University of Cambridge. He originally graduated from the Norwegian Army Officer School, where he learnt to appreciate the importance of good product design during a winter on the Norwegian-Russian border.